woman scolding senior woman

Are You Missing the Signs of Elder Abuse in an Aging Loved One?

woman scolding senior woman

Learn these signs of elder abuse to keep an aging loved one safe.

It’s a given that abusing a senior is something that is unthinkable in the minds of most people, but it’s a prevalent issue in the United States. Elder abuse happens in many forms, from physical to emotional, and it affects the most frail and vulnerable among us. Read more

signs of a TIA

Learning the Signs of a TIA to Keep Seniors Safe

signs of a TIA

Learning the signs of a TIA can save a senior’s life.

Slurred speaking. A numb feeling on one side of the body. Confusion. Sounds like a stroke, right? However, if those stroke-like symptoms subside rather quickly and are relatively minor, they may be the result of a TIA (transient ischemic attack). But before breathing a sigh of relief and going about life as usual, it is vital to understand the facts about TIAs, the signs of a TIA, and why they should always be brought to the attention of a doctor right away. Read more

signs of dysphasia

How to Help Seniors Experiencing Signs of Dysphagia

signs of dysphasia

Get help managing the signs of dysphagia in aging adults.

On those scorching summer days, there is nothing more refreshing than a tall, cold drink; however, for seniors with dysphagia, this simple pleasure could be very dangerous. Dysphagia – or difficulty with swallowing – affects millions of seniors due to weakened mouth and/or throat muscles. Cancer, Alzheimer’s, MS and stroke are all causes as well. Read more

Alleviate Your Compassion Fatigue as a Caregiver

Compassion fatigue is a normal part of the caregiver experience, but we can help you manage it!

Caregivers give up so much of themselves for the sake of the ones they care for – both emotionally and physically. It’s easy to become worn down and to start to experience feelings like apathy, exhaustion, and a withdrawal from the person in your care. This is often known as compassion fatigue or secondary traumatic stress, and it can be harmful to your own health and wellbeing. It could also hinder your ability to be as warm, nurturing, and caring as you need to be for the person you’re caring for. Read more

fact or myth graphic

Clearing Up Common Misconceptions About Incontinence

fact or myth graphic

Dispel some myths and misconceptions about incontinence.

Urinary incontinence can be an embarrassing topic for those who are experiencing it. There is a lot of misinformation surrounding the condition that often leads to common misconceptions about incontinence. Below we dispel a few common incontinence myths: Read more

Caregiver talking with senior

How Caregivers Can Help Some Common Causes of Senior Incontinence

Caregiver talking with senior

Learn how to help an aging adult ease senior incontinence.

For aging adults, reduced bladder control, or senior incontinence, is an unsettling and sensitive issue. It can result in a number of problems, from skin sores to social isolation for individuals who are afraid to leave home in case of an “accident.” Bladder leakage affects more than 25 million Americans, and yet, the condition does not receive nearly as much attention as it needs. With the lack of communication and information about senior incontinence, many older adults and those who provide their care feel as though there is nothing that can be done about it. Read more

senior man working outside in the garden

Tips to Help Aging Loved Ones Maintain Independence

senior man working outside in the garden

As a family caregiver, it’s important to help aging loved ones maintain independence.

Throughout the many stages of life, “independence” can mean different things. There are major events, such as leaving our parents’ home or getting married, and less significant events, like completing a difficult task on our own. Then, as we age, staying as independent as possible becomes a priority, like being able to live safely and securely in your own home. This wish to grow older in place at home is usually the greatest desire for older adults, regardless of their condition of health or ability to function independently, even in the face of injuries, sickness or chronic health problems. And it’s why as family caregivers, we need to do everything we can to help aging loved ones maintain their independence.

Read more

Advice for Including Aging Loved Ones in Holiday Festivities

Learn how to best include aging loved ones in holiday festivities.

Though the holiday season is normally a joyful time of high spirits, filled with visiting loved ones who are nearest and dearest, for seniors, it can be far from merry and bright. A combination of lost loved ones, health problems, memories of holidays past, and more can impact seniors with emotions of sadness and loneliness, and it can make including aging loved ones in holiday festivities challenging. Read more

How to Plan Holiday Activities for Aging Adults

Here are some tips for planning holiday activities for aging adults.

The holidays are filled with parties, celebrations, and get-togethers. Yet for older adults, holiday outings call for a little extra planning, and sometimes, it’s challenging for family members to plan holiday activities for aging adults. Try these tips from the Chandler home care experts at Endeavor In Home Care to enjoy joyful activities with loved ones of all ages this holiday season. Read more

Strategies to Help Reduce the Dangers of Wandering With Dementia

Many people experiencing dementia are prone to wander, which can be dangerous.

Of all the outcomes of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, one of the most concerning is the individual’s tendency for wandering. The dangers of wandering with dementia may cause the older adult to become disoriented or lost. Wandering may possibly occur if the senior loved one is:

  • Tending to a simple necessity such as trying to find a glass of water or visiting the bathroom
  • Wanting to keep a familiar past routine such as planning to go to a job or shopping
  • Trying to find someone or something
  • Frightened, confused or overwhelmed
  • Bored

If you are caring for a loved one that is experiencing a form of dementia, it is important to keep the senior safe, and also to be certain that his/her needs are fulfilled in order to attempt to stop the desire to wander in the first place. Try the following dementia wandering prevention tips if a senior loved one in your care begins to show signs of wandering:

  • Utilize any locks that are in place which the senior is not able to master, such as a sliding bolt lock above his/her range of vision, as well as alarms, even something as simple as placing a bell over doorknobs. It’s also a good idea to register the person for the Alzheimer’s Association’s Safe Return Program.
  • Disguise exits by covering doors with curtains, positioning temporary folding barriers strategically around doorways, or even using wallpaper or paint to match the doors to the surrounding walls. You can even try placing “NO EXIT” signs on doors, which may sometimes dissuade people in the earlier stages of dementia from trying to exit.
  • An additional hazard for individuals who wander is the elevated risk of falling. Examine each room of the home and take care of any tripping concerns, such as removing throw rugs, electrical cords, and any obstructions which may be blocking walkways, ensuring sufficient lighting is switched on, and utilizing gates at the very top and bottom of stairways. 

It’s important to keep in mind that with guidance and direction, wandering is not necessarily a problem. Go for a walk outside with the senior anytime weather allows and the person is in the mood to be on the go, providing the additional benefit of fresh air, physical exercise, and quality time together. 

For additional dementia wandering prevention tips, contact the dementia care specialists at Endeavor In Home Care. Our compassionate care team is available to provide respite care for families, assistance with personal care needs, and engaging activities to help your loved one remain active. Give us a call today at (480) 498-2324 to schedule a free in-home assessment and to learn about why we are one of the leading providers of at home care in Phoenix and the surrounding areas.