senior woman smiling with a teacup

Tips to Help Seniors Age at Home Safely

Seniors can age at home safely with senior home care in Phoenix and the surrounding areas.

The vast majority of older individuals would prefer to age at home where they are comfortable, rather than making a move to an assisted living facility or nursing home – nearly 90 percent of them, based upon research done by AARP. And who can blame them? The comfort of home, the freedom to go wherever, whenever you would like, and preparing the meals you want when you want them are all invaluable commodities.  Read more

caregiver comforting senior with behaviors of Alzheimer's

How to Respond to the Complex Behaviors of Alzheimer’s

caregiver comforting senior with behaviors of Alzheimer's

Reacting thoughtfully to difficult behaviors can reduce stress for those impacted by Alzheimer’s.

Alzheimer’s is a complex condition that often presents overwhelming issues for those providing care. As the disease continues into later stages, those with Alzheimer’s become increasingly dependent on communication through behavior rather than speech, and oftentimes these behaviors are of an inappropriate nature. For instance, someone with more advanced Alzheimer’s disease may present the following: Read more

adult son caring for senior mother with dementia

Overcoming the Challenges of Caring for Someone with Dementia

adult son caring for senior mother with dementia

Support is available for the emotional challenges common when caring for someone with dementia.

Picture how it would feel to awaken in an unfamiliar location, not able to remember how you arrived there or even what your name is. Progressing into complete disorientation, then quickly leading to anger and fear, you might find yourself lashing out at the unknown person positioned beside your bed, talking to you in a quiet voice. Read more

Stroke Recovery

Try These Easy Tips to Improve Stroke Recovery at Home

These simple tips can make stroke recovery at home safer and more comfortable.

Stroke recovery at home is both an emotionally and physically challenging process, and the main thing you long for is to get back to your regular life. Nevertheless, given that more than half of stroke survivors often have some means of disability, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in-home safety modifications may need to be made to make post-stroke life easier and safer. Read more

Teaching Technology to Seniors

Top Trends for Elderly Care Technology in 2021

Teaching Technology to Seniors

For more tips on teaching technology to seniors, call our care team.

In 2020, our home care services’ experts saw firsthand how vital the role of technology is in the lives of older adults. As we kick off 2021 and encounter the challenges of the new year, health and wellbeing are at the forefront of how we consider elderly care technology. In 2021, it’s anticipated that these technology trends will be the ones to consider. Read more

Teaching Technology to Seniors

How to Overcome the Challenges of Teaching Technology to Seniors

Teaching Technology to Seniors

For more tips on teaching technology to seniors, call our care team

Seniors today are inundated with a surge of high-tech products aimed at elevating their self-reliance and safety and contributing to life enhancement. Teaching technology to seniors means that with the touch of a button or two, seniors can instantaneously visit “in person” with family and friends through Skype, wear a necklace that responds with emergency services when needed, and even stay safe from getting lost with specialized sensors attached to clothing or shoes.

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young marn with arm around senior man, Alzheimer's

Responding to Dementia Confusion: Should I Play Along?

Dementia confusion, a typical occurrence in Alzheimer’s, can lead to recent memories being forgotten about or distorted, while memories from the more distant past usually stay unaffected. This can cause past events to make more sense to a senior with dementia than the present. A person’s alternate reality can be the senior’s way of making sense of the present through past experience.

Seniors with Alzheimer’s disease often have problems expressing themselves, and at times their alternate reality has more to do with a physical requirement or a distinct feeling they want to express rather than the actual words they are saying.

For example:

  • “I need to deliver all these casseroles to the neighbors before the end of the day.” Though these casseroles do not exist, the words could actually represent a need for meaning in everyday life or wanting to be involved in an activity. A suitable response to find out more could be, “Why did you make casseroles for our neighbors?”
  • “When will my wife be coming home?” This question may be more about a need for affection or acceptance or a home-cooked meal than it could be about wishing to see his wife, who passed away many years ago. An appropriate reaction to uncover more might be, “Why would you like to see her?”

Keeping a diary of these kinds of events can help you notice a pattern in the older person’s dementia confusion. The more you listen in and pay close attention, the easier it will become to understand the thinking behind the alternate reality and the ideal way to react.

Is It Alright to Play Along?

As long as the scenario isn’t going to be unsafe or improper, it is perfectly fine to play along with the senior’s alternate reality. Doing so won’t make the dementia worse. Keep in mind, the senior’s reality is true to him/her and playing along can make your loved one feel more comfortable.

If the situation is inappropriate or may possibly cause harm to the older adult, try to respond to the perceived need while redirecting him/her to something safer or more appropriate.

Bear in mind these 3 actions:

  1. Reassure the older adult.
  2. React to his/her need.
  3. Redirect if required.

Also, call on the caregiving team at Endeavor In-Home Care, providing senior home care in Phoenix and the surrounding areas, including specialized dementia care. Our caregivers are on hand to provide compassionate, professional respite care services for family care providers who could use some time to rest and recharge. Contact us any time to learn more at 480-498-2324.

Caring for elderly parents

Tips to Brighten Everyone’s Day When Caring for Elderly Parents

Let our Phoenix area home care team help improve quality of life for a senior loved one in your life.

Millions of Americans have found themselves in the role of providing senior care for an older loved one, and although serving as a family caregiver is incredibly rewarding in many ways, the day-to-day duties involved with senior care can come to be monotonous for both the caregiver and the older adult. The Phoenix home care experts at Endeavor In-Home Care want to assist you in putting the fun back in your loved one’s day-to-day routine. All it takes is a bit of ingenuity! Try some of these suggestions to help brighten your loved one’s day and make caring for elderly parents more enjoyable: Read more

Long Distance Caregiver

Long Distance Caregiver Tips: How to Help Older Parents Remain Safe and Independent

Living at a distance from older loved ones can make the need for home care easier to miss. As a matter of fact, many adult children of aging parents never even realize that Mom and Dad need help until they return home for a visit or spend extended time together over the holiday season. If you’re a long distance caregiver for a senior loved one, it becomes that much more essential to have a plan in place for emergency situations and care. Read more

Caregiver Burnout

Steps to Avoid Sandwich Generation Caregiver Burnout

Do you have aging parents in need of help to ensure safety at home? Are you also trying to manage caring for children and family at home? If so, you are part of the sandwich generation – a generation of people, mostly in their 30s or 40s, who have become responsible for bringing up their own children while simultaneously providing care for their senior parents. The to-do lists of this sandwich generation are loaded and caregiver burnout can quickly become reality. Numerous family caregivers not only work full-time, but they’re also taking their children to and from school, after-school activities and managing household tasks on top of their caregiving obligations. There are solutions to help caregivers though, and the first step is learning how to make the situation more manageable. Read more