Communicate With Seniors With Alzheimer’s

Communicate With Seniors With Alzheimer’s: Stage by Stage

Communicate With Seniors With Alzheimer’s

Learn how to communicate with seniors with Alzheimer’s at different stages of their condition.

Even the most simple needs can be a struggle to communicate for aging adults with Alzheimer’s disease. As a family caregiver trying to communicate with seniors with Alzheimer’s, you may feel at times as though you’re trying to solve a puzzle in determining how to meet the needs of someone you love and ensure life is as fulfilling, safe, comfortable, and enriching as can be. Read more

Alzheimer's communication

Alzheimer’s Communication Tips: Nonverbal Communication

Alzheimer's communication

Learn these nonverbal Alzheimer’s communication tips to help communicate more effectively.

Trying to connect with an aging loved one with Alzheimer’s through conversation, particularly in the middle and later stages, is often a challenge – both for you and for the person with Alzheimer’s. Brain changes affect the ability to listen, process, and respond appropriately to conversations, and it’s up to us to put into action innovative Alzheimer’s communication tactics to more effectively interact with a loved one with dementia. Read more

senior woman exercising outdoors

What Are The Best Exercises for People With Alzheimer’s?

senior woman exercising outdoors

Learn the best exercises for people with Alzheimer’s disease.

Of course, there are plenty of benefits of physical exercise that most people are aware of, but what isn’t as well known are the best exercises for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Exercise can help lower the chance of muscle weakness and other issues that stem from inactivity, can reduce the impact of psychological and behavioral changes, and more. Read more

How to Plan Holiday Activities for Aging Adults

Here are some tips for planning holiday activities for aging adults.

The holidays are filled with parties, celebrations, and get-togethers. Yet for older adults, holiday outings call for a little extra planning, and sometimes, it’s challenging for family members to plan holiday activities for aging adults. Try these tips from the Chandler home care experts at Endeavor In Home Care to enjoy joyful activities with loved ones of all ages this holiday season. Read more

Strategies to Help Reduce the Dangers of Wandering With Dementia

Many people experiencing dementia are prone to wander, which can be dangerous.

Of all the outcomes of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, one of the most concerning is the individual’s tendency for wandering. The dangers of wandering with dementia may cause the older adult to become disoriented or lost. Wandering may possibly occur if the senior loved one is:

  • Tending to a simple necessity such as trying to find a glass of water or visiting the bathroom
  • Wanting to keep a familiar past routine such as planning to go to a job or shopping
  • Trying to find someone or something
  • Frightened, confused or overwhelmed
  • Bored

Read more

Make a Dementia-Friendly Home Using the ABC’s

Do you know the ABC’s of making a dementia-friendly home?

If a loved one has recently been diagnosed with dementia, your top priority is probably his or her safety and wellbeing. The familiarity of being able to remain living in the comfort of their own home rather than face a move away to a facility is important, but how do you ensure continued safety and wellbeing as the disease progresses? One of the first things you can do to ensure a safer environment is to make a few adjustments around the house. It is possible to create a dementia-friendly home, which can encourage continued independence for the older adult you love. Read more

caregiver comforting senior with behaviors of Alzheimer's

How to Respond to the Complex Behaviors of Alzheimer’s

caregiver comforting senior with behaviors of Alzheimer's

Reacting thoughtfully to difficult behaviors can reduce stress for those impacted by Alzheimer’s.

Alzheimer’s is a complex condition that often presents overwhelming issues for those providing care. As the disease continues into later stages, those with Alzheimer’s become increasingly dependent on communication through behavior rather than speech, and oftentimes these behaviors are of an inappropriate nature. For instance, someone with more advanced Alzheimer’s disease may present the following: Read more

adult son caring for senior mother with dementia

Overcoming the Challenges of Caring for Someone with Dementia

adult son caring for senior mother with dementia

Support is available for the emotional challenges common when caring for someone with dementia.

Picture how it would feel to awaken in an unfamiliar location, not able to remember how you arrived there or even what your name is. Progressing into complete disorientation, then quickly leading to anger and fear, you might find yourself lashing out at the unknown person positioned beside your bed, talking to you in a quiet voice. Read more

young marn with arm around senior man, Alzheimer's

Responding to Dementia Confusion: Should I Play Along?

young marn with arm around senior man, Alzheimer's

Learn how to respondto dementia confusionin a way that provides comfort.

Dementia confusion, a typical occurrence in Alzheimer’s, can lead to recent memories being forgotten about or distorted, while memories from the more distant past usually stay unaffected. This can cause past events to make more sense to a senior with dementia than the present. A person’s alternate reality can be the senior’s way of making sense of the present through past experience. Read more

senior man making hand expression, Denying A Dementia Diagnosis

Anosognosia – Why Is My Parent Denying a Dementia Diagnosis?

Dementia can have many side effects,including anosognosia.

“How on earth could you think that I have dementia? There is not a single thing wrong with me!”

If a senior loved one with a dementia diagnosis communicates feelings like this, you may think to yourself that the senior is essentially in denial and reluctant to admit to such a concerning diagnosis. Yet there could be a different reason: anosognosia, or someone’s actual unawareness that he or she is affected by dementia. Read more